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Uzbekistan Cuisine
 
 
 

General

Uzbek cuisine is influenced by local agriculture, as in most nations. There is a great deal of grain farming in Uzbekistan, so breads and noodles are of importance and Uzbek cuisine has been characterised as "noodle-rich". Mutton is a popular variety of meat due to the abundance of sheep in the country and it is a part of various Uzbek dishes.

Uzbekistan's signature dish is palov (plov or osh), a main course typically made with rice, pieces of meat, and grated carrots and onions. Oshi nahor, or "morning plov", is served in the early morning (between 6 and 9 am) to large gatherings of guests, typically as part of an ongoing wedding celebration. Other notable national dishes include shurpa (shurva or shorva), a soup made of large pieces of fatty meat (usually mutton) and fresh vegetables; norin and lagman, noodle-based dishes that may be served as a soup or a main course; manti, chuchvara and somsa, stuffed pockets of dough served as an appetiser or a main course; dimlama (a meat and vegetable stew) and various kebabs, usually served as a main course.

Green tea is the national hot beverage enjoyed throughout the day, and teahouses (chaikhanas) are of cultural importance. Black tea is preferred in Tashkent, and both are typically taken without milk or sugar. Tea always accompanies a meal, but it is also a drink of hospitality, automatically offered – in a choice of green or black – to every guest, much in the same way that coffee is offered in Western cultures. Ayran, a chilled yogurt drink, is popular in summer, but does not replace hot tea.

The use of alcohol is less widespread than in the West, but wine is comparatively popular for a Muslim nation as Uzbekistan is largely secular. Uzbekistan has 14 wineries, the oldest and most famous being the Khovrenko Winery in Samarkand, which was established in 1927. The Samarkand winery produces a range of dessert wines from local grape varieties – Gulyakandoz, Shirin, Aleatiko and Kabernet likernoe (literally Cabernet Dessert Wine in Russian). Uzbek wines have received international awards and are exported to Russia and other countries.


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